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Jennifer Garner Sends Selfie to a Wrong Number; Calls it a Humbling Experience

Garner was attempting to text her former Alias co-star Carl Lumbly after the show’s 20th anniversary

Jennifer Garner tried catching up with an old friend, but fell for a classic case of mistake identity!

The Elektra star, 49, made herself the butt of the joke as she posted a screenshot on Instagram this Friday. In it we see the actress send someone a selfie, mistaking them to be her Alias co-star Carl Lumbly. In it, we can see her message “Carl–this is Jen G. Here comes proof.”

The Alias reunion

Jennifer Garner texts a wrong number
Instagram/@jennifer.garner

The actress was in the process of sending a selfie when the other person quickly responded, “Wrong number.” But too late, the picture was sent. She laughed at her error and told the person she was looking for her friend.

She called the experience “Humbling,” in her caption, before adding the hashtags: “#IfYouAreWorkingWithCarlLumbly #PleaseTellHimImLookingForHim #BristowAndDixon.

Garner and Lumbly starred as Sydney Bristow and Marcus Dixon in the critically-acclaimed series. The cast got together earlier this week to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the show. Alias ran on ABC from 2001 to 2006.

Garner even made her TikTok debut in honor of the reunion and showed photos of her and her former co-stars meeting in person. They included Michael Vartan, Merrin Dungey, Kevin Weisman, Gina Torres, Mia Maestro, and Victor Garber.

She also thanked the show’s creator J.J. Abrams on Instagram, for pushing the cast “through and past the norm.”

Ready for a reboot

Jennifer Garner
Instagram/@jennifer.garner

Back in March, Garner told The Hollywood Reporter that she’s ready to join Alias if they ever reboot it. She also added that she will “grab Bradley by the scruff of his neck,” referencing her former co-star Bradley Cooper who didn’t make it to the reunion.

 

Also read: Jason Blum and Tyler Perry to Collaborate for a New Horror Flick “Help”

 

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